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Jenschr’s Makeblock 3D printer build log

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DESCRIPTION

The idea is to build a printer based on the ideas in Lulzbot’s TAZ printer30. The TAZ is basically the same as a Reprap Mendel 9011, but it has a vertical X-axis for the print head carriage. My plan is to use a horizontal carriage (like on Mendel 90), but since I`m building it with Makeblock, it will be fairly easy to switch this later.
I’ll use only Makeblock parts if possible and anything that is suitable using just standard parts. This means that I’ll try to build all linear parts with the linear blocks rather than the typical LMU8 used in other printers.
I already have an Ultimaker & a Printrbot, so I’m not just building any old printer. The build volume should be huge (almost 30x30x30cm) and the hotend will be from E3D in the UK. The E3D hotend12 can reach the 260C required to print Nylon without melting. I can’t do that with the other two printers.
I got great help from the Makeblock crew getting hold of parts and the first thing I did was to build the main frame.
DETAILS

#THE PLAN

The idea is to build a printer based on the ideas in Lulzbot’s TAZ printer31. The TAZ is basically the same as a Reprap Mendel 9012, but it has a vertical X-axis for the print head carriage. My plan is to use a horizontal carriage (like on Mendel 90), but since I`m building it with Makeblock, it will be fairly easy to switch this later.

I’ll use only Makeblock parts if possible and anything that is suitable using just standard parts. This means that I’ll try to build all linear parts with the linear blocks rather than the typical LMU8 used in other printers.

I already have an Ultimaker & a Printrbot, so I’m not just building any old printer. The build volume should be huge (almost 30x30x30cm) and the hotend will be from E3D in the UK. The E3D hotend13 can reach the 260C required to print Nylon without melting. I can’t do that with the other two printers.

I got great help from the Makeblock crew getting hold of parts and the first thing I did was to build the main frame. It`s really quite solid! Here’s me standing on top of it in the Bitraf8hackerspace lab.

#DAY ONE

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After going through the parts and testing some ideas, I solved how to fasten the Z-axis (up/down) steppers and linear rails this first evening.

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Here’s the frame before I attached the linear rails.

#DAY TWO

Today it was time to start on the Y-axis. I want it to be detachable for transport (like on the TAZ) and fairly wide so I can easily fit the build surface onto it. The first annoyance was that the two 24×24 beams will not fit perfectly hole-wise. Bummer. I`ll have to use the main holes on one side and then the center-slot on the other side. Both will work, but I had hoped for it all to align.

I didn’t have any beams that were wide enough, but I’ve joined some 8×24 beams in a way that looks good. Two nylon spacers at the end of the linear rails make these fit as well. Looks good!

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In this picture you can also see the Z-axis steppers that I fitted the day before. Now it’s gliding, so next up it’s time to add the stepper that moves it. The first three designs I did for this, had a major flaw – they used the 18T pulley. No matter how I tried to force the belt stay onto the pulley, it still slipped :(

Now if I only had a slightly bigger pulley, this would not happen. The ideal would be a 32T pulley or something like that, but that’s not part of the Makeblock system (yet). The next size is the 62T pulley, but this one is missing pulley slice’s so I’ll have to use the 90T version then. Oh! I also have some of those new Nylon pulleys with bearings! Let’s see…

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Yeah. This will work. Next problem – building a platform that clears these rods and pulleys. I soon realised that I didn’t have the most suitable beams at hand. I tried lots of variants, but this is the solution I settled on:

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This will do for now, but I’ll need to change this a bit. Hopefully I’ll get some extra parts from Makeblock.no(my local reseller) tomorrow, but in the mean time I’ll work on the Z-axis. In the back, you can see the 30×30 cm wooden board that will hold the heater.

Source: http://hackaday.io/project/1541-jenschrs-makeblock-3d-printer-build-log

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DIY a Constructor-i 3D Printer

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The do-it-yourself (DIY) movement, has many intersections with that of the 3D printing space. A large portion of those who own desktop 3D printers are obviously interested in DIY projects. After all, when you 3D print anything, you are involved in some sort of DIY project, whether you realize it or not.

Makeblock, based in Shenzhen, China is a 30 person team which caters to the DIY community by offering a vast array of mechanical parts and electronic modules to help turn ideas into successful projects. From plates, to beams, to motors, sensors, brackets, controllers, and drivers, MakeBlock offers it all. All the parts on their platform are able to easily interconnect with one another, providing a seamless method of construction. The company has been offering a variety of interesting kits for anything from robotics to electric motors.

Recently, however, the company has entered the 3D printing space, with the launch of a DIY kit for their Makeblock Constructor I 3D Printer. Many of you may be used to putting together 3D printers from kit form, but this is no simple kit. The purpose of this printer being sold this way, is not simply to save money on assembly costs, but to provide DIY’ers an awesome educational project. The kit for the Makeblock Constructor I 3D Printer includes approximately 400 parts in total, making this an incredibly interesting project to tackle for those who enjoy the sense of accomplished, after making something practically from scratch.

The actual printer, once assembled, is quite a powerful machine, featuring an anodized aluminum frame, and decent print resolutions. Below you will find some of the general specifications of the MakeBlock Constructor I.

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  • Printer Size: 324mm X 312mm X400mm
  • Print Materials: 1.75mm PLA
  • Build Envelope (WxDxH): 125mm x 165mm x 120mm
  • Speed: 40mm/s, max 100mm/s
  • XY Resolution: 0.1mm
  • Layer Resolution: 0.1-0.3mm
  • Extruder: All metal, temperatures up to 250 degrees Celcius
  • Software: Slic3r+Printrun, Cura, kisslicer, MatterControl, Skeinforge
  • Firmware: Marlin
  • File Type: STL

For those interested in taking on this project, the entire kit can be pre-ordered right away for $699.99. MakeBlock hopes to begin shipping the kits out before October 10 of this year. For customers who pre-order the kit, Makeblock will throw in an additional spool of PLA filament, as well as a $50 coupon for their next purchase.  It is recommended that you download and read the complete instructions prior to dishing out the $699.99 for the kit, as it may be more complicated than you initially thought.

Let us know if you plan on purchasing the kit, and how the assembly goes. Feel free to post a diary of your assembly within the Makeblock Constructor I forum thread on 3DPB.com.  Check out the full list of all 400 parts of this printer which need to be put together, followed by a video of the completely assembled Constructor I 3D Printer below.